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Can a divorced non-catholic marry in a catholic church?
Dating / 3:49 PM - Wednesday November 28, 2012

Can a divorced non-catholic marry in a catholic church?

A twice divorced non-catholic friend of mine is dating a catholic lady. I'm curious - can he marry in a catholic church?

- Asked by Male, 36-45

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no he can't. I'm Catholic and once you're divorced for reasons other then the Vatican allows, you can't get married in a Catholic church. If he went to a Catholic official to explain that the divorce was because of abuse, alcoholism, cheating.. and then was referred to file his divorce with the Vatican, then it would be a different story.

- Response by nani1996, A Creative, Female, Who Cares?

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Actually, it all depends on what HIS religion is, and where he was married the first two times. Where they religious ceremonies - esp Christian ones? Or were they civil ceremonies? Was he ever married in a Catholic (RC, Orthodox, Greek Catholic, Ukrainian /Croatian/Polish/Russia n, Coptic etc.) ceremony, or an Anglican / Episcopal church? If so then he may have to get an annulment for those marriages. If they were at city hall, then the RC church considers him to be never married. If that is the case then they are both free to be wed in a RC ceremony. BTW, the use of the term catholic applies to most Christian churches, with a few exceptions... Seventh Day Adventists, Mormon and Jehovah's Witness, which are still considered cults by mainstream churches

- Response by springbreaker, A Father Figure, Male, 46-55, Toronto, Self-Employed

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No, I'm Roman Catholic and if one of the partners have been married before, you can't marry into the Catholic Church. Even if the other person has never been married.

- Response by jrastro, A Thinker, Female, 29-35, Who Cares?

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No. He's not Catholic.

Unless he converts.

- Response by hnygrl, A Career Woman, Female, 46-55, Managerial

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He can have a blessing in the Church, but not marry

- Response by rumloverreturns, A Cool Mom, Female, 46-55, Glasgow, Other Profession

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No.

- Response by rafiki910, A Mr. Nice Guy, Male, Who Cares?, Boston, Body Work

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True.... would have to convert

Marriage outside of a church a Celibrant can do service.


- Response by berri, A Career Woman, Female, 46-55, New South Wales, Who Cares?

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Not to sound like an anti-Catholic because I'm not, I'm more of an anti-BSer. Since a priest can get away with perving out on kids (should be shot I say), caring if you are divorced shouldn't matter, right? Wrong? UNLESS you can afford a small fee paid in full. Don't be an idiot --twice divorced and you weren't married in the church? Never counted anyway, so says the church --you're good to go... If you're Catholic, you can't call it quits until you have it annulled (it's probably a guilt clause deal), kind of a hypocrite mentality, but it is what it is...erase it and it never happened. Too bad erasing in humanity isn't really a reality. Be a good man and good spouse and your next marriage will last forever whether you get married in some church, at the beach, in the mountains or in Tahoe. Make sense?

- Response by A Hippie Chick, Female, 46-55

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That really depends on that person's professed religion and whether the church he or she married under is recognized by the Catholic Church. Sometimes they consider marrying under certain faiths as a non-wedding (marriage).

- Response by wetwired, A Sweet Sarah, Female, 29-35, Vancouver, Who Cares?

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If he isn't Catholic and is divorced, his previous marriages would have to be annulled by the church in order to be able to marry not only in the church, but also for the church to recognize the marriage as legitimate for her. He could also convert and then get an annulment for the other weddings. There are only certain reasons why annulments will be issued, such as infidelity, mental illness, etc. Also, if a Catholic didn't marry in a Catholic church or go through courses on the sacrament of marriage, then he or she has a higher likelihood the marriage can be annulled. Getting an annulment isn't an easy process, but it can be done for the right reasons. I am a Catholic who began the process and was able to meet the criteria, but there are many steps to completing it.

- Response by A Trendsetter, Female, Who Cares?

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Also, the person who mentioned "bastard" children is 100% wrong. This is not a "legal" annulment of marriage. It is one done through the church only. I know because I have started the process. It only has to do with Church law and no child is ever considered a bastard when there is a divorce.

- Response by A Trendsetter, Female, Who Cares?

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Short answer is, yes, but he's going to have to jump through some big hoops.

It's easier if neither of the first two marriages are catholic.

Good luck and God bless

- Response by kravjar666, A Father Figure, Male, 46-55, Los Angeles, Consulting

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Yes. He will have to get one if not both of his marriages annulled.

- Response by graziella, A Hippie Chick, Female, 46-55, Philadelphia, Artist / Musician / Writer

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I would think that if he had not been married in the church, his marriages would not be recognized as valid anyway. But I could be wrong. He may need to convert.

- Response by jophus, A Rebel, Male, 29-35, Artist / Musician / Writer

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They do NOT have to convert, they indeed can be married IF it is their first marriage. Now your friend has been married before and that is a different story. The Church will investigate the previous marriage, and annul it if sufficient evidence exists. It is a lengthy process, but very thorough and you have to answer some personal questions. For instance, if you were under the influence of drugs or alcohol when married previously that would be reason enough for annulment. There are many reasons for annulment and since your friend wants to marry a Catholic person, his former marriages will have to be investigated and see if they can be annulled. I too have a dear female friend who wants to marry a guy who is Baptist and has been married before. They are going through the annulment process now and this has to be done or they cannot marry in the Catholic Church.
Marriage is a sacrament in the Catholic Church and is taken very seriously. Even some Protestant preachers will not marry someone who is divorced because of Biblical references.

- Response by hearmenow, A Guy Critical, Male, 56-65, Other Profession

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a non catholic can see the light and become catholic I guess-then the past is gone and a new life awaits-it is much harder for a divorced catholic to remarry (and remain in the church)
but people have done it so trust your heart not religion-love will find a way-

- Response by movi, A Guy Critical, Male, 46-55, Administrative

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I think it wouldn't be recognised as such unless his previous weddings also took place in a church.

- Response by stiffkittenbabelfish, Female, 29-35, Teaching

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Okay I was raised Catholic so these are the rules that I was told by my family and the priest. In order for a non Catholic to marry in a church they do have to convert if they want to marry in a church. My friend who is a non catholic married her now husband in a church. It is their first marriage. So she had to take Catechism class, for adults, for her to marry in a church. But your friend significant other, he is non Catholic and divorced. Churches will not let him marry unless they investigate if the divorced was based on his wife actions, if it is her fault, cheated on him, etc. But he still has to convert to marry in a church.

- Response by womanv, A Career Woman, Female, 36-45, New York, Self-Employed

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WOW did you ever think there would be such leagalism in the church! I guess in the review of the responses-all things are possible with God-I am a fan of vegas weddings elvis aliens so on-worst case would be a court house union-best case with more cash a settlement and a conversion-I mean it would be awesome and you would get communion in YOUR parrish-think of the fees and cost to marriage and it's FOREVER in the church's eyes-not to be entered into lightly by any means-

I would think before any of this you would look into your heart and see if this is really what you want-I would check on your SOUL condition before entering into any contracts with GOD or El Diablo you know there is a real heaven and a real hell and there is no ice downstairs....

- Response by movi, A Guy Critical, Male, 46-55, Administrative

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Man made religious rules are the epitome of hypocrisy and ignorance.

- Response by greekattorney, An Intellectual Guy, Male, 36-45, Political / Government

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Sure can. All the non-catholic needs to do is join the Catholic church and have his previous marriage anulled. They have a process for this already worked out.

- Response by 2wheels, A Creative, Male, 56-65, Retired

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Converting to Catholicism to marry a Catholic is old school. It is no longer a requirement. Some of you have old information, from back in the day, when some of my in-laws were required to convert when marrying my siblings. That is NO LONGER the case. Annulments are required, as well as a promise to raise any children born of the marriage as Catholics. That is all.

- Response by naiveladyquestions, A Thinker, Female, 46-55, Other Profession

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I should add, two of my in-laws chose to convert. My sister's husband is a Christian man, but does not attend church services, having chosen NOT to convert. He promised never to deny her right to practice her faith, and to raise the children Catholic. They were happily married in the Catholic Church, and still are. He attends services every now and then, but is happy just as he is. Proving once again that we are all free to worship as we see fit. And once the children have reached the age of confirmation, they can either choose that, or not, based on their understanding. But he will have lived up to his promises.

- Response by naiveladyquestions, A Thinker, Female, 46-55, Other Profession

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