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Can you get sores on your mouth if you give head and he doesn't have a STD?
Sex & Intimacy / 10:50 PM - Sunday August 02, 2009

Can you get sores on your mouth if you give head and he doesn't have a STD?


- Asked by kakayan123, A Thinker, Female, 22-25

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anything is possible.. you can break out from his pubic rubbing on your face, anything minor can cause a sore. but if he doesn't have a std, there should be nothing to worry about you know...are you possitive he doesn't have a std, or are yopu just taking his word for it.
i would still be careful, they do sell flavored condoms now..

- Response by mburgos, A Cool Mom, Female, 46-55, Philadelphia, Who Cares?

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Yes.

Cold Sores (HSV-1) & Canker sores are very common.


- Response by steve67, A Rebel, Male, Who Cares?

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Safer Sucking Tips to Prevent Syphilis and Other Infections
.Before giving a blow job, look at your partner's penis:
Open sores, lesions, warts, or oddly coloured discharges
can indicate an STI.
.Be aware of any cuts, abrasions or sores inside your
mouth or on your tongue. Rinsing with salty water is one
way to check - stinging or soreness is a good indicator
that you should take special care. Cuts and sores
increase your risk for STIs during oral sex, and can
increase your risk for HIV.
.If you've got an open sore in your mouth, it's especially
important to protect yourself with a condom when giving a
blow job.
.If you brush or floss your teeth, wait at least 30 minutes
before sucking. If you smoke or have nutritional problems,
your gums can take up to two hours to heal.
.Using a condom during oral sex reduces your risk for STIs.
.Unlubricated or flavoured condoms can make for a more
enjoyable blow job.
.Don't share sex toys if you use them for oral sex. Put a
condom on a dildo just as you would on a cock.

Sores of the mouth

Common Causes
Most mouth sores are cold sores (also called fever blisters), canker sores, or other irritation caused by:

Biting your cheek, tongue, or lip
Chewing tobacco
Braces
A sharp or broken tooth or poorly fitting dentures
Burning your mouth from hot food or drinks
Cold sores are caused by herpes simplex virus and are very contagious. Usually, you have tenderness, tingling, or burning before the actual sore appears. Herpes sores begin as blisters and then crust over.

The herpes virus can reside in your body for years, appearing as a mouth sore only when something provokes it. Such circumstances may include another illness, especially if there is a fever, stress, hormonal changes (such as menstruation), and sun exposure.

Canker sores are NOT contagious and can appear as a single pale or yellow ulcer with a red outer ring, or as a cluster of such lesions. The cause of canker sores is not entirely clear, but may be related to:

A virus
A temporary weakness in your immune system (for example, from cold or flu)
Hormonal changes
Mechanical irritation
Stress
Low levels of vitamin B12 or folate
For unknown reasons, women seem to get canker sores more often than men. This may be related to hormonal changes.

Less commonly, mouth sores can be a sign of an underlying illness, tumor, or reaction to a medication. Such potential illnesses can be grouped into several broad categories:

Infection (such as hand-foot-mouth syndrome)
Autoimmune diseases (including lupus)
Bleeding disorders
Malignancy (cancer)
Immunosuppression (that is, when your immune system is weakened -- for example, if you have AIDS or are receiving medication after a transplant).
Drugs that might cause mouth sores include chemotherapeutic agents for cancer, aspirin, barbiturates (used for insomnia), gold (used for rheumatoid arthritis), penicillin, phenytoin (used for seizures), streptomycin, or sulfonamides.



Home Care
Mouth sores generally last 10 to 14 days, even if you don't do anything. They sometimes last up to 6 weeks. The following steps can make you feel better:

Gargle with cool water or eat popsicles. This is particularly helpful if you have a mouth burn.
Avoid hot beverages and foods, spicy and salty foods, and citrus.
Take pain relievers like acetaminophen.
For canker sores:

Rinse with salt water.
Apply a thin paste of baking soda and water.
Mix 1 part hydrogen peroxide with 1 part water and apply this mixture to the lesions using a cotton swab.
For more severe cases, treatments include fluocinonide gel (Lidex) or chlorhexidine gluconate (Periden) mouthwash.
Nonprescription preparations, like Orabase, can protect a sore inside the lip and on the gums. Blistex or Campho-Phenique may provide some relief of canker sores and fever blisters, especially if applied when the sore initially appears.

Additional steps that may help cold sores or fever blisters:

Apply ice to the lesion.
Take L-lysine tablets.
Anti-viral medications for herpes lesions of the mouth may be recommended by your doctor. Some experts feel that they shorten the time that the blisters are present, while others claim that these drugs make no difference.



Call your health care provider if
Call your doctor if:

The sore begins soon after you start a new medication
You have large white patches on the roof of your mouth or your tongue (this may be thrush or another type of lesion)
Your mouth sore lasts longer than 2 weeks
You are immunocompromised (for example, from HIV or cancer)
You have other symptoms like fever, skin rash, drooling, or difficulty swallowing
http://www.righthealth. com/topic/Sores_In_The_ Mouth/overview/adam20?f did=Adamv2_003059&secti on=Summary



- Response by askwhatever, A Thinker, Female, 56-65

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Could be a regular old cold sore.

- Response by beantownchica34, A Hip Hop Girl, Female, 22-25, Who Cares?

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What kinda sores are you talking about?

- Response by louisiana70, A Life of the Party, Male, 36-45, Consulting

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